Elegant  Survival

Stylish Living
 on a Shoestring

Since 2006

M-J's Miscellany

Grenfell Ventile Jacket

Posted on February 22, 2017 at 7:10 PM

Superb Ventile Jacket by Grenfell, Made in England, Highest Quality Vintage Garment in EXCELLENT Condition

https://www.etsy.com/shop/TweedRocks


Black Tie Guide

Posted on January 20, 2014 at 11:10 AM

How to Wear Black Tie,

by Antonio Centeno, the founder of Real Men Real Style

Double-Breasted Suit

Posted on November 10, 2013 at 9:30 AM

Clothing Care, Courtesy of Monsieur Francois

Posted on August 3, 2013 at 1:55 PM

 CLOTHING CARE TIPS 

Implementing some of the following procedures will go a long way in helping you protect and extend the life of your garments: 

Dry clean your garments sparingly. Frequent cleanings can actually cause your garments to prematurely wear because of the solvents and heat that are used in the dry cleaning process. Consider dry cleaning only when necessary or, at the end of the season before storing. After cleaning, garments should be removed from the plastic bags and aired. 

Limit the use of fabric softeners. They contain additives that stick to your clothing to make them feel softer. Unfortunately, frequent usage of these softeners will also compromise the fabric's absorbency and make them less breathable. 

Use padded or shaped hangers as they are more gentle on your garments than wire ones. Uncoated wire hangers may also rust and stain your clothes.

 Avoid hanging your coats and jackets on racks or hooks, which may cause the neck areas to stretch out of shape. 

Give your wool garments a day's rest between wearings, allowing them to shed wrinkles and return to their original shape. 

Fold knitted garments instead of hanging them, to prevent distortion or stretching. 

Brush your garments regularly and thoroughly to refresh  them, removing any soil, hair, etc. Use a slightly damp sponge or cloth on knits and finer fabrics. 

Always read the label on your garment for specific washing-instructions. 

Allow deodorants and antiperspirants to thoroughly dry before you dress. Also, consider using dress-shields to your garments to protect them against excessive perspiration, which can weaken certain fabrics. 

All garments should be either laundered or dry cleaned prior to storage. This step is not only essential, but will prevent attracting moths. 

Never store your jackets or garments in plastic bags. They create limited air flow which may trap moisture and cause mildew to form. Plastic bags may even cause leathers and suedes to dry out. Use canvas or cloth bags instead. 

Select a storage area carefully, avoiding those with high temperatures and/or high humidity. 

To revive your clothes when you have removed them from storage: first air out the garments thoroughly and then either brush them and/or lightly pass a garment steamer over them to remove any wrinkles or creases and to perk them up. Air the clothes thoroughly after these procedures, and before putting them to your closet.

~~Monsieur François, Townline Tailors of Vancouver, British Columbia

 

 

The Folly of Following Fashion

Posted on April 4, 2013 at 11:05 AM
These are "not your father's jackets"--NO, they're your LITTLE BROTHER'S hand-me-ups that, of course, don't remotely fit!
Ralph Lauren used to be a leader, now he is pathetically following the worst trends in fashion history.
©M-J de Mesterton
Elegant Dressing

TWEED DAY TALE

Posted on April 2, 2013 at 10:25 AM

APRIL 3RD IS TWEED DAY!

Our friend Steve Worthington, eminent storyboard artist and sculptor, has written and illustrated a tale for Tweed Day, which is tomorrow, the Third of April.

Click upon the miniature picture to see Steve Worthington's scintillating Tweed Day tale, an action-story that highlights the desirability of tweed cloth....

Steve Worthington and His Wife Meridee Mandio's Professional Page: Storyboard Squad.


The Elegantly-Dressed Man

Posted on October 27, 2012 at 4:45 PM

The Elegant Man's Accessories

The Gentleman's Trifecta is my husband's term for the group of things represented in this photograph, which we took in 2007.

I explain a little more in the following editorial, which I wrote and published on Elegant Survival in 2010:

Burberrys Suit from Sphere Magazine, Christmas Number, 1936

The Elegantly-Dressed Man

In this stylish drawing of a man, you don't see a skinny jacket that is bursting open to expose sad trousers that hang at the hip, a bulging shirt and too-long tie. What we see here is a man who wears his trousers at the right length, ones that don't pile-up like discarded potato sacks on top of his shoes, and which come up to the actual human waist, thereby visually lengthening his legs. And we see the gentleman's traditional accessories: hat, gloves and walking-stick, each of which serves a purpose, including protection from the elements, enthusiastic pigeons, dirt, germs, roving animals, and whoever may dare to attack him or anyone else in his immediate vicinity; the gentleman is always well-prepared for a stroll down today's mean streets. Alas, this picture is clipped from an advert by Burberrys that appears in one of my 1930s Sphere magazines. Today's men, in general, look like short, dumpy cads in clothes that are designed to distort human proportions. (Add the slovenly yet popular three-day growth beard to complete a tragic modern image.) Never in history has so much sartorial splendour been readily accessible, and yet men have seldom looked worse. It doesn't cost any more to dress correctly than it does to do it badly, especially since some of the ghastliest clothes are going for the highest prices. There are few contemporary examples of elegant dressing in trendy venues and magazines. Help yourself by not following fashion, but instead by looking toward the best elements of the past for useful examples of tasteful masculine dress.

©M-J de Mesterton 2010

Fred Astaire Style

Posted on August 20, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Elegant Burton Suit

Posted on January 3, 2012 at 12:45 PM


Town and Country Suit by Burton of Leeds

Read the measurements carefully for this elegant man's wool suit, vintage 1960s


Tweed Trench-Coat

Posted on January 3, 2012 at 12:30 PM


Please read the measurements carefully. This elegant, double-breasted British tweed trench-coat is a treasure for the elegant man. You definitely ought to forgo the bottom-feeders' two-inch fly pants while wearing this classic piece of menswear from Great Britain.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/OUTSTANDING-VTG-BRITISH-TWEED-TRENCHCOAT-44-/380393889801?pt=UK_Men_s_Coats_Jackets&hash=item58913e2009

English Country Boots

Posted on October 24, 2011 at 5:00 PM

Cheaney Pennine II English Veldtschoen Country Boots 10 Wide--Superb Condition!

Town & Country Suit 44R

Posted on October 11, 2011 at 12:45 AM

Caring for Your Shirts

Posted on September 25, 2011 at 9:50 AM


Washing and Drying Your Shirts

By M-J de Mesterton, Copyright 2008

A well-made shirt can cost $500.00 or more. That is an investment to protect. Your shirts will last much longer if they are washed by hand and hung to dry. Don’t use so much detergent that it takes a rinsing marathon to remove it. “A little dab’ll do ya”, as the old Brylcreem jingle said. Ideally, one would hang shirts on a clothesline, upside down, with clothespins. This keeps pinch-marks off the important areas of your shirts. The sun will dry them in no time. Alternatively, one could hang them indoors, perhaps out-of-sight behind the the shower curtain, on hangers. A sturdy spring-rod, placed inside the shower area for the purpose of hanging clothes to dry will not interfere with your existing shower-rod. If you don’t want to get hanger-marks on the shoulders, just put wash-cloths under them, over the ends of your hanger. The worst thing to do, even if you wash your shirts in cold water in the gentle cycle, is to dry them in a machine–doing so will quickly degrade your shirt, which will die an angry death before its time. My husband and I have shirts from France and England that are twenty years old, and in perfect condition. An electric, energy-consuming dryer is an enemy to high-quality clothing. In fact, dryers shrink clothes and wear them out quickly; lint is composed of fibers that a machine robs from your clothes. You’d be surprised at how swiftly shirts dry naturally, and when they are just a wee bit damp, they’re easy to iron.

In cases of stubborn collar and cuff soil (I call it "cafe crud"), when hand-scrubbing fails, you can still wash your white shirts in hot water, soap, and a little bleach if necessary, as long as they are rinsed well, and then hung to dry. (Bleach alternative may be a better choice, if you can get it to work on stubborn stains.) Bleach is to be used only after stain-removal steps like soaking in Zote soap or Octagon (shirtmaker Alexander Kabbaz recommends Octagon for hand-washing his works of art) have been attempted without success. Always use as little bleach as possible, diluted before adding to wash-water, and only on white shirts. Bleach has a corrosive effect on your shirt’s fibers. The sun will do some natural bleaching of white cotton. Save costly energy and prolong the life of your shirts by hand-washing and sun-drying them. Giving your precious shirts to a dry-cleaner or other laundry service is wasteful. They crush buttons and machine-dry the poor things.

Do clothes hanging on a line outdoors conjure up bad images for you? Too bad, because it is one of life’s simple luxuries to be able to dry a beautiful, well-made shirt in the sun–some of the best people do it. Believe me, it’s not remotely infradig to care for your own shirts. After all, who cares for them more than you do? ~~Copyright M-J de Mesterton, May 2008

Town & Country Tweed Suit

Posted on September 19, 2011 at 7:55 PM
Offered by our sterling friend Peter in Herefordshire, this town and country style tweed suit is elegant and slimming.